[acn-l] ~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 8/4/00<~~ (fwd)

PETER.UNMACK at asu.edu
Wed, 09 Aug 2000 18:19:30 -0700 (MST)

From: FISH1IFR at aol.com
Date: Tue, 8 Aug 2000 22:46:56 EDT
Subject: ~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 8/4/00<~~
To: AFS at wyoming.com, ACN-L at pinetree.org, crab-l at ios.bc.ca,
fishhabitat at mail.orst.edu, oceancoalition at onelist.com,
salmon at riverdale.k12.or.us

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~~>FISHLINK SUBLEGALS 8/4/00<~~
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A WEEKLY QUOTA OF FISHERY SHORTS CAUGHT AND
LANDED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR FISHERIES RESOURCES
AND THE PACIFIC COAST FEDERATION OF FISHERMEN'S
ASSOCIATIONS

VOL 2, NO. 5 4 AUGUST 2000
<<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>><<>>><<

2:05/01. CALIFORNIA COASTAL CONSERVANCY CONTRACTS
WITH IFR TO STUDY REMOVAL/ MODIFICATION OF SAN
CLEMENTE DAM: On Wednesday, 2 August, the California Coastal
Conservancy voted to contract with the Institute for Fisheries Resources
(IFR) to study the modification or removal of San Clemente Dam on the
Carmel River in Monterey County. The dam, largely silted in, is blocking
passage and removing spawning habitat for steelhead. The Carmel River like
many other central and south coast California rivers is also believed to have
once supported coho salmon runs, but in recent years has provided mostly
meager habitat for steelhead. Heading up the study for IFR will be Dr. Guy
Phillips, a resources economist with extensive experience nationally and
internationally working on dam and hydroelectric issues, and Dennis
Gathard, a Seattle-based engineer,who has consulted on numerous dam
removal projects including Edwards Dam on the Kennebec River in Maine,
the Elwha Dam in Washington State and is currently working on a number
of breaching projects in Vermont. The Coastal Conservancy/IFR contract was
reported in the Monterey Herald on 2 August.

The San Clemente contract is the latest in a series of efforts by IFR and
PCFFA on dam removals that was started by PCFFA's late Habitat
Conservation Director Nat Bingham on Battle Creek and subsequently
expanded into the Butte Creek watershed under the leadership of the late
writer Marc Reisner on behalf of IFR. IFR, in fact, was to administer
Reisner's Pew Fellowship grant for dam removal. In the Pacific Northwest,
PCFFA/IFR's Glen Spain has been active on the Snake River and Oregon
dam removal projects. In December, IFR and PCFFA co-sponsored a San
Francisco workshop with the University of Wisconsin on dam removal.
PCFFA is also one of three groups actively pushing SB 1540 (Sher) in the
California Legislature to develop a state program for the removal or
modification of non-federal, non-state dams. Dam removal is part of IFR's
on-going Salmon Protection Program. For more information, e-mail IFR at:
ifrfish at aol.com.

2:05/02. SKYROCKETING ELECTRIC RATES IN SAN DIEGO
MAY SPUR CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE AND GOVERNOR TO
PAY ATTENTION TO HYDROPOWER DIVESTITURE: The recent
doubling and tripling of electric rates in San Diego County because of energy
deregulation has spurred the Legislature and California Governor Gray Davis
to begin looking for ways to prevent a similar occurrence across the rest of
the state. Full deregulation of energy is expected with the proposed
divestiture of the last remaining element of Pacific Gas & Electric's (PG&E)
power generation system, its hydroelectric facilities. PCFFA is the sponsor
of legislation, AB 1956 by Assembly Majority Leader Fred Keeley (D-
Boulder Creek), supported by consumer and most environmental groups,
water agencies and local counties, that calls for the state to take-over the
currently regulated PG&E hydro facilities, "clean them up" and then sell
them into the private deregulated market (see Sublegals, 18 February 2000).
That bill, however, was stalled by PG&E in the Assembly Utilities &
Commerce Committee. PG&E's proposed auction of its hydro facilities is
currently before the State Public Utilities Commission. The California
Legislature is expected to take up the energy rate issue when it returns from
its summer recess on 7 August. For more information on AB 1956 go to the
following website:
http://democrats.assembly.ca.gov/english/featurestory/20000222-603.htm.

2:05/03.COMMITTEE FORMING TO STUDY EFFECTS OF
BOTTOM TRAWLING ON SEAFLOOR HABITAT: The National
Research Council's Ocean Studies Board is forming a committee to conduct
an 18-month study to examine the effects of bottom trawling on seafloor
habitats. The study will be funded by the National Marine Fisheries Service
(NMFS). Nominations by category of expertise are being accepted at this
time until 15 August 2000. To make a nomination, or for additional
information, contact Ed Urban, Study Director, Ocean Studies Board, U.S.
National Research Council at (202) 334-2714.

2:05/04. CALIFORNIA SALMON CATCHES UP OVER LAST
YEAR, CPUE HIGHER THAN 1988: The California Department of Fish
& Game today, 4 August, released the catch figures for the 2000 ocean
salmon fishery for the period of 1 May to 30 June showing 443,000 king
salmon had been landed by commercial trollers in the state. That figure
compares with 264,500 fish taken in the commercial fishery for all of 1999.
While the overall number of fish is about average for the State, and well-
below the nearly 750,000 fish caught during the same period in the 1988
record year, this year's number is nevertheless remarkable since the fleet
size
is about one-third of what it was in 1988. Also the area of the coast
available
to the fleet is much less with most of the north coast closed. Fort Bragg,
for
example, once the largest ocean salmon port on the coast does not open its
season now, because of Klamath River restrictions, until 1 September. For
the first two months of the 2000 season the catch per unit of effort (CPUE)
has exceeded the 1988 rate, with an average of 43 fish per day per vessel
being harvested in 2000 compared with 21 fish per boat day in 1988. The
average size of the fish is also up, much higher than the usual ten-pound
average. The sport catch of salmon is also up, tripling that of 1999. For
more
information, contact Alan Grover at the California Department of Fish &
Game: agrover at dfg2.ca.gov.

The increase in the California catch is part of a trend along the Pacific
Coast where both Washington and Oregon catches and spawning
escapements have also increased. Alaska, however, has been down (see
below). Part of the increase has been due to better in-river conditions,
including California's successive wet winters, and good oceanic conditions
with ample forage as a result of the La Nina upwellings. California
commercial catches have tapered off during July, in part, because the fish
have moved into closed areas such as Fort Bragg where sport catches have
remained high. Returning Central Valley salmon spawners this year are
again expected to be double that of the escapement goal set for what is now
the west coast's most prolific salmon producing system.

Not only are the catch figures up, but so are prices. After dipping to
new
lows only two years ago, of as little at $1.00 per pound in some instances,
wild troll king prices have rebounded and are now at an average $2.75 ex-
vessel. For the first time in 25 years, the French are again buying
California
salmon after the European market was taken over by farmed fish for the past
two decades. Health concerns and demand for natural foods, including the
reaction against genetically-modified foods, has helped lead the way for
California and Alaska salmon back to Europe. Alaska and California salmon
have also topped a number of environmental-buyer guides as examples of
sustainable fisheries. For more information, visit the California Salmon
Council's website at: www.calkingsalmon.org.

2:05/05. RECORD LOWS ON RUNS OF SALMON IN ALASKA
DRAW MILLIONS OF FEDERAL DOLLARS: Two weeks ago, Alaskan
Governor Tony Knowles declared a state fishery disaster in Western Alaska
and asked for federal aid. Last week, the federal government, provided funds
under the Magnuson-Stevens Act. The aid, according to an Anchorage Daily
News report, is destined for the Yukon, Kuskokwim and Norton Sound
regions. The funds come from the Commerce Department, which has some
$15 million appropriated by Congress last year for community economic
development through the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration
(NOAA). A second Commerce Department declaration on Thursday allows
the Small Business Association to join the aid effort. For more information
visit: www.fishmonger.com

2:05/06. UK MARINE ACCIDENT INSPECTOR CALLS FOR
BLACK BOXES ON FISHING BOATS: The 28 July issue of the British
trade paper, Fishing News, reports that the head of the U.K.'s Marine
Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB), Rear Admiral John Lang, is calling
for the introduction of aircraft style black box recorders to be fitted to all
fishing vessels. Lang, Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents, was reported
saying, "the continued failure to install 'voyage data recorders' and the
'implacable refusal by some flag states to even countenance fitting them on
economic grounds' continues to hamper marine accident investigations.

"It usually requires a major disaster in a particular ship type to
persuade
the international community to approve the fitting of VDRs in that type of
ship only. In my opinion this means the installation is always too late,"
Lang
was reported saying. "I remain uncompromising in my view that it is
essential to find out exactly what went wrong and why, when an accident
occurs. The need to identify both the primary and underlying causes remains
paramount." For more information, visit Fishing News website at:
www.fishingnews.co.uk.

2:05/07. CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF WATER RESOURCES
DOLES OUT PROPOSITION 13 FUNDS FOR URBAN STREAMS
RESTORATION PROGRAMS: The fall 2000 grant cycle will make
available the first $2 million of the $25 million included in California's
Proposition 13 (Safe Drinking Water, Clean Water, Watershed Protection
and Flood Protection Act) for urban stream projects. Tentatively, the grant
cap for the Fall 2000 application cycle will be $200,000 per project. Persons
interested in applying for a grant through the Urban Streams Restoration
Program, should visit the following website:
http://wwwdpla.water.ca.gov/environment/habitat/stream/usrp.html for
updates beginning mid-August. In the meantime, for a sample application
please refer to the Department of Water Resources' Spring 2000 application
package (also on the website).

2:05/08. REGIONAL WATERSHED COORDINATORS TO BE
HIRED FOR CALIFORNIA: For the Sake of the Salmon, has been
contracted by the California Resources Agency to hire three Regional
Watershed Coordinators for three coastal regions of California (north,
central, and south-central). The coordinators will provide assistance to
watershed organizations. The contracts will run for one year beginning
1November 2000. For more information, visit http://www.4sos.org

2:05/09. ALBACORE PRICES UP: The Western Fishboat Owners
Association (WFOA), representing Canadian, U.S., New Zealand and
Western Pacific Island nation's albacore fleets reports that the ex-vessel
price for this tuna has increased to $1925 per ton unloaded in American
Samoa and $1575 per ton at U.S. west coast buying stations. Currently most
of the albacore landings are taking place off the coast of Oregon. Prices for
European export and sashimi markets for bot blast/bled and brine fish are
reported at $1850 to $2,000 per ton ex-vessel. For more information, contact
WFOA at (707) 443-1098.

2:05/10. SQUID ADVISORS SOUGHT, LEGISLATION TO
CONTINUE RESEARCH/MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MOVING: The
California Department of Fish & Game is seeking two members for the
California Squid Fishery Advisory Committee. One is to fill the fishermen
position from the San Pedro area; the other is to fill the
environmental/conservation position on the committee. Applications are due
by 15 August. For more information contact Patricia Wolf (562) 590-5117
or go to the DFG's website at: http://www.dfg.ca.gov
In a related action, the California Assembly Water, Parks & Wildlife
Committee will take up SB 1544, by Senator Byron Sher (D-Palo Alto) to
extend for one-year the current law on squid research and management to
allow DFG and the Fish & Game Commission time to complete the squid
management plan and recommendations to the Legislature. Sher was the
author of the 1997 legislation to establish a management program for the
state's largest fishery.

2:05/11. NYC MOSQUITO SPRAYING BEING BLAMED FOR
LONG ISLAND SOUND LOBSTER DIE-OFF: The New York Times
reported on 31 July, that lobstermen are blaming New York City's extensive
mosquito spray program for a "catastrophic lobster kill" in Long Island
Sound last fall wiping out "90% of the full sized population." The
pesticides
used in the city's mosquito abatement program were washed into the Sound
by the heavy rains from Tropical Storm Floyd. In addition to the lobsters,
crabs and other crustaceans were also affected. On the west coast, herbicides
used in forestry have been thought to have an adverse affect on salmon in-
stream.

2:05/12. EIGHTH BIENNIAL CONFERENCE OF THE
WATERSHED MANAGEMENT COUNCIL SCHEDULED FOR
NOVEMBER: The title of this year's conference will be: "Managing
Watersheds in the New Century." It will be held at the Asilomar Conference
Center, Monterey/Carmel, California, 27-30 November 2000. For more
information contact the Watershed Management Council at the University
of California/Davis, phone: (510)273-9066 or www.watershed.org/wmc .

2:05/13. DRAFT NATIONAL PLAN FOR SHARKS RELEASED:
The National Marine Fisheries Service has released its draft National Plan
of Action (NPOA) for sharks. The plan was developed pursuant to the
endorsement of the International Plan of Action (IPOA) for the Conservation
and Management of Sharks by the United Nations' Food & Agriculture
Organization (FAO) Committee on Fisheries (COFI) Ministerial Meeting in
February 1999. The plan was prepared in consultation with scientific and
technical experts and federal and state agencies. Comments must be received
by 30 September. Comments and requests for copies of the draft NPOA
should be sent to Margo Schulze-Haugen, Highly Migratory Species
Management Division (F/SF1), NMFS, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver
Spring, MD 20910. (301) 713-1917.

2:05/14. CONFERENCE ON ENDANGERED SPECIES: The
University of California at Davis is holding a conference titled "Endangered
Species: Water Resources Issues and Coordinated Compliance" on 11-12
September 2000 in Sacramento. They will also be hosting: "Wetlands
Regulation and Mitigation," 8 September 2000, Davis. For more information
call (800)752-0881.

2:05/15. GOP PLATFORM PLANK COULD LEAD TO SALMON
EXTINCTION: A plank adopted by the Republican Party at Philadelphia
for its platform opposing the removal of Snake River Dams is a "policy that
would lead to extinction of salmon," charged American Rivers, a national
conservation group that has worked with PCFFA and other fishery,
environmental and tribal groups and fish scientists for the removal of the
four dams on the Lower Snake River. The platform plank, sponsored by
Congressman Doc Hastings (R-WA), opposes breaching the earthen portion
of the four Lower Snake River dams. As adopted by the Convention on
Monday night, the plank states: "Breaching dams would not only raise
electric rates but would deny western farmers irreplaceable water for
irrigation and cost-effective means of moving their crops to West Coast
ports. We should develop and use technologies that will help enhance salmon
runs while keeping the dams in place." What the plank did not say was that
tug-and-barge traffic on the Columbia and Snake ("cost-effective") is heavily
subsidized; nor did the plank say that scientists believe the only way to save
the salmon is by breaching the four dams. For more information, visit:
www.americanrivers.org.

2:05/16. CALIFORNIA SET NET FISHERY UNDER STRESS: The
California set net fishery along three areas of the state's coast is being
threatened with change and, in one area, elimination. In the Monterey Bay
area, recent revelations by observers of a large bycatch of common murre
and harbor porpoise may mean that fishery will be moved into deeper waters
in order to avoid the sea birds and marine mammals unless there can be some
modification of the gear to avoid the bycatch. A meeting with that fleet will
be held Tuesday evening, 8 August, at the Department of Fish & Game
offices in Monterey to discuss what actions can be taken. For more
information on that meeting, contact the Department of Fish & Game at:
(831) 649-2870.

In Sacramento, the Senate Natural Resources & Wildlife Committee will
be hear AB 2570 on 8 August, that would allow the Department of Fish &
Game to move the set net fishery offshore Morro Bay and Avila further
offshore than the current 30 fathoms in the event there was evidence the nets
may result in the take of sea otters. The recent southern migration of sea
otters led to calls for closures on the set net fishery, which primarily
targets
on California halibut, in this area although, to date, there had been no
documented incidents of otters becoming entangled in the nets.

Further south, the National Marine Fisheries Service is proposing a
closure in federal waters of the set net fishery in the Huntington Flats area
offshore San Pedro. Although this has been a clean fishery, as opposed to
some of the set net fisheries elsewhere, the Department of Fish & Game
under pressure from some sport fishing groups has pressured NMFS to
conform federal law to state law. The deadline for comments on the
proposed closure was 2 August; PCFFA wrote comments in opposition
charging NMFS and the Department with a selective enforcement of the law
and questioning why a fishery with no problems was being targeted for a
closure, while those fisheries with severe bycatch, overfishing and habitat
destruction problems are largely being ignored by the fishery agencies. For
a copy of PCFFA's comments, contact us at: fish1ifr at aol.com.or visit the
PCFFA website after 8/15/00.

2:05/17. TWO ANTI-ENVIRONMENTAL INITIATIVES ON
OREGON NOVEMBER BALLOT: Failing to get their agenda through the
last Legislature over a Governor's veto, property rights advocates in Oregon
have succeeded in qualifying two Constitutional initiative measures that
would effectively end Oregon's zoning and land use authority as well as its
ability to control air and water pollution. Measure 2 would allow anyone
who objected to any new regulatory restriction to invalidate the regulation
of their choice merely by collecting 10,000 voter signatures, after which it
would have to be specifically approved by the full Legislature to take
effect.
Legislative inaction or gridlock, which is the general rule, would
automatically invalidate the regulation. Under this scheme any special
interest group with the money to collect signatures and the votes of a handful
of key lawmakers could effectively block any regulation it chose to single out
for elimination. Its companion, Measure 7, is a sweeping "takings" bill that
would require compensation to any landowner whose property values
decreased in any way as a result of any future rule or regulation. There
would be no compensating credit for the public benefits of such regulations.

Zoning laws to prevent sprawl, many health and safety regulations as well
as most environmental pollution protection laws would automatically trigger
this compensation, under Measure 7, making them cost prohibitive to most
cash strapped cities and counties. Future watershed protection, pollution
control and salmon restoration efforts in Oregon could become impossible
should these two measures become law. The Oregon and U.S. Constitutions
already provide for just compensation for the taking of property by a
government, but not for every reduction of property values below
landowners' often inflated expectations. For more information, text and an
official neutral summary of Oregon Measures 2 and 7 see:
http://www.sos.state.or.us/elections/nov72000/2000genmea.htm. An
organization has been formed to oppose these measures and can be reached
at: Oregon Community Protection PAC, 1220 SW Morrison, Suite 910,
Portland, OR 97205 (503)796-9369 for more information.

2:05/18. WATERSHED CONFERENCE SCHEDULED FOR
SEPTEMBER: "Cumulative Watershed Effects: Status, Gaps and Needs"
is the title of a conference scheduled for 7-8 September in Sacramento, CA.
The purpose of the conference is to further the dialogue among agencies,
watershed activists and fish restoration groups on developing better ways to
assess and manage Cumulative Watershed Effects (CWE), especially in
forested, mixed-ownership watersheds in California. For more registration
information on the conference, contact Joni Rippee at:
rippee at nature.berkeley.edu.

2:05/19. NMFS SCHEDULES EDUCATION WORKSHOPS FOR
SWORDFISH, THRESHER SHARK DRIFTNET CAPTAINS: The
National Marine Fisheries Service will be convening Skipper Education
Workshops to review the status of the Pacific Offshore Cetacean Take
Reduction Plan. These workshops are mandatory for operators of fishing
vessels that participate in the California/Oregon drift gillnet fishery for
thresher shark and swordfish. There will be a total of six workshops offered
at no cost at the locations listed below. The workshops will review the
status
of the implementation of the Take Reduction Plan, enforcement of the Take
Reduction Plan, and progress at achieving the marine mammal bycatch
reduction goals established pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act
and the Endangered Species Act. For more information, contact Tim Price
at: (562) 980-4029. The workshops are scheduled for 1300-1700 HRS on the
following dates and locations:

**Thursday, 24 August, Holiday Inn on the Bay, 1355 North Harbor Drive,
San Diego

**Monday, 28 August, Sheraton Portland Airport Hotel, 8235 NE Airport
Way, Portland

**Tuesday, 5 September, Moss Landing Harbor District Office, 7881
Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing

**Wednesday, 6 September, Best Western Sea Pines, 1945 Solano Street,
Los Osos

**Thursday, 7 September, Santa Barbara Waterfront Department, 125 Harbor
Way, Santa Barbara

**Thursday, 14 September, Federal Building, 501 West Ocean Boulevard,
Long Beach

GOT NEWS?: Submit news items to Molly Thomas, editor at:
ifrfish at aol.com or call the IFR office with the news and a source at either:
(415) 561-FISH (Southwest Office) or (541) 689-2000 (Northwest Office).

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